Costock Parish Council

Annual Nature Reserve Rake

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Costock Parish News

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Costock Nature Reserve

Annually the Costock Nature Reserve needs to be cut, then 2 weeks later raked.

The gap between the cut and the rake allows for flower seeds to drop onto the soil to increase the biodiversity of the site. The increase in flower numbers has been extremely successful and documented. Last year we were delighted to identify 80 different  flowers.

The rake usually starts the 3rd weekend in September and may continue on thereafter dependent upon the number of volunteers and progress.

This year we were lucky with the weather- making hay whilst the sun shines is always an advantage. We were also fortunate to have a good turnout which was further enhanced by a number of new, young volunteers including Logan, Ethan, Oliver, Aneurin, Hugo and Alex. A huge thank you to them!

If you would like to become a Friend of Costock Nature Reserve and receive updates of news and/or would like to help then please contact me, Lindsay, on lindsay.mcgowan@costock.parish.email

Welcome to Costock Village

Costock is situated in the south of the Borough on the A60 Loughborough Road. The village is situated in an elevated position in the Nottinghamshire Wolds Character Area and is surrounded by arable and pasture land. The neighbouring village of East Leake is situated less than a mile to the west along Leake Road while just over a mile to the south along the A60, lies the village of Rempstone.

Costock’s historic core, bounded by Church Lane and Chapel Lane is very picturesque and has a genuine village feel with winding and secluded lanes, trees and high walls.

Costock Manor House
St Giles Church
St Giles Church

The church and Manor House stand close together, the latter being one of the most charming Elizabethan stone houses in Nottinghamshire. The church of St Giles on the other hand, has undergone major restoration in 1688, 1848 and 1862, though some of the original 14th century masonry, both internal and external, still remains.